Recruiting for Football – Recruiting Rankings Don’t Guarantee Success on the Field

Despite their popularity among fans, recruiting rankings – rankings of college football programs based on the perceived quality of their high school recruiting classes each year – sometimes have little relation to the success of those programs on the field in later years.

Of the eight teams ranked among the top 10 in recruiting by each of threeUFABET ผ่านมือถือ national recruiting websites for 2006, six of them (USC, Georgia, Florida, Texas, Penn State, and Notre Dame) failed to rank among the top 25 in the final Associated Press poll after the 2010 football season.

Most players recruited in 2006 would have completed their final year of eligibility in fall 2010, when they could be expected to among the most experienced and skilled players on a particular team, contributing the most to team success in games during the season.

A top high school recruiting class could be expected to mean top performance for a college team as those players move into starting positions on the field as they are college seniors. In the 2010 season, that didn’t happen for quite a few teams with top-ranked recruiting classes in 2006.

But that’s not all.

Even more telling is that many of the most successful college programs on the field in 2010 were far down in the recruiting rankings for their high school recruiting classes in 2006.

For example, TCU, ranked No. 2 in the final AP poll for fall 2010 season, and Stanford, ranked No. 4, weren’t among the 50 best recruiting classes designated by one major recruiting site in 2006. The same site ranked Oregon’s 2006 recruiting class only at No. 49, yet Oregon played in the national championship game and ended up as No. 3 in final AP poll following the fall 2010 season. Other recruiting websites ranked these teams’ 2006 recruiting classes low as well.